How’s My Crystal Ball?

Prediction is dangerous, especially when it involves the future.”

Yogi Berra                                   

Greece appears to be moving steadily toward implementation of the brutal terms imposed by the troika (EU, ECB, and IMF) as conditions for the provision of more liquidity to Greek banks and a new ESM loan to the government. There can always be further twists and turns to the Greek tragedy, but we’ve come far enough to assess the accuracy of my prior predictions in this blog. By my count, I got one of my three predictions mostly wrong, and a second correct in principle but wrong on magnitude. Here’s my scoring:

1) Who’s on First? I thought Greece’s new Syriza leadership (Prime Minister Tsipras and Finance Minister Varoufakis) entirely misunderstood the strength of their negotiating position. When you are going hat-in-hand to someone to whom you have previously lied when borrowing money, in order to borrow more money you simply must have in order to survive, you cannot possibly expect to dictate terms. Germany’s Angela Merkel was the key player on the other side, and she was never going to make any deal that would leave her constituents paying indefinitely for Greeks to enjoy better public-sector benefits than they themselves received. Score this one correct.

2) Outside looking in. I predicted that Greek hubris and miscalculation would place them outside the Euro by midsummer. I missed this one on two grounds. First, I underestimated the utter determination of much of the Eurozone to keep Greece in, despite the endless provocations of Tsipras and company. Second, I did not anticipate the ultimate complete surrender to austerity by Tsipras. While we can’t entirely discount the possibility of Tsipras and company snatching even-worse-defeat from the jaws of defeat, I score this one wrong.

3) Buy on the cannons. My final prediction was that significant market dislocation attendant on a Grexit would provide a buying opportunity for European equities, followed by a strong rally. I’ll score this one both semi-correct and unresolved. European markets declined but did not crash, making a low on July 8, then rallied a bit more than 6%. We’ll have to wait and see where European stocks go in the coming years, compared to U.S. equities.

There is one poorly understood aspect of the Greek drama I got substantially correct. The central problem for Europe was keeping Greece within the Euro while simultaneously discouraging the growth of anti-austerity parties in other Eurozone nations. Greece’s comprehensive failure to improve its position by electing a radical-Left government has been noted in other countries, such as Spain, where anti-austerity party Podemos has been losing support.

A quick aside. One of Warren Buffett’s fundamental principles of investing is that we are much better at understanding today’s values than we are at predicting tomorrow’s outcomes. In this respect, it is worth pointing out that my commentary on Europe’s crisis is intended to provide context for understanding our investment strategy, which remains entirely driven by relative prices and relative yields, and not by predictions–mine or anyone else’s.

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