Whose High Horse?

The sin of doing nothing is the deadliest of all the seven sins. It has been said that for evil men to accomplish their purpose it is only necessary that good men should do nothing.”

Reverend Charles F. Aked[1]

“God always rides a lame horse and carves on rotten wood.”     

                                  Martin Luther

His comments at the National Prayer Breakfast offered two elements at which Obama excels – first, some statements of general principle, designed to demonstrate his generosity and reasonableness, followed by a brief but shocking aside to signal his true feelings to his base. In the aftermath, critics on the right have been predictably outraged at the peek behind the curtain, while useful idiots on the left have defended President Obama’s historical perspective.

The President’s request to Congress for an Authorization of Military Force resolution was also vintage Obama, beginning with a strongly-stated case of the dangers posed by ISIL, followed by a specific non-authorization of “enduring offensive ground combat operations,” proceeding to a three-year hard deadline, and ending by repealing the 2002 authorization of force against Iraq, thus in effect more constraining the actions of this and future Presidents than enabling them. Unclear ends to be achieved by limited and probably insufficient means, with an exit timetable in place regardless of the future facts on the ground.

Think for a moment about what Obama would have said had he been President at the time of Pearl Harbor. I imagine it might have been something like this:

‘Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date that should serve as a prompt to reflect upon our own past offences against persons of color at home and abroad, naval and air forces associated with the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere made an unscheduled visit to our installations at Pearl Harbor, Oahu, facilities that must remind us of our own shameful history of neo-colonial aggression. Lest we get up on our high horse, it will be recorded that the distance from the administrative center of the Co-Prosperity Sphere to the Hawaiian Islands is actually less than that to the center of our own capital of Washington, DC. This makes it obvious that we must ask the question, whose interests stop where? Let’s not confuse our own narrow self interest with some sort of moral crusade, especially against a nation with which we have such a special history of positive engagement, going back to an earlier act of outreach by a great leader of the other party. If Teddy Roosevelt could so generously reach out to Japan in 1908, sending our brave sailors on a mission of peace, not conquest, surely we can find common ground in 1941, especially when we ourselves have, perhaps unwisely, contributed greatly to tensions by imposing a needless embargo on the steel and oil that our neighbors across the Pacific need to grow their own economy and provide opportunities for their own young people. We are better that that.’

Fighting a war requires clarity of purpose, determination and mobilization of popular sentiment, all on display in President Franklin Roosevelt’s actual Pearl Harbor address to Congress. It does not require prior moral perfection or a national history free of blemish. Indeed, if those were required prior to any exertion of military force, we would never have fought the Civil War or intervened in Europe during the Great War, and we must surely have allowed the Nazi and Japanese military expansionist regimes to run unchecked, and surrendered the rest of the world to Communism instead of fighting the Cold War.

[1] The classic statement of this principle, “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men should do nothing,” is attributed to the great Irish parliamentarian Edmund Burke. It is impossible to exaggerate Burke’s contribution to Western thought and modern conservatism. Unfortunately, there is no evidence he ever said or wrote this precise construction of this sentiment.

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